OUR IMPACT

WNP is an impact-focused organization. We aim to make the largest impact possible when it comes to greening the web. We partner with Cool Effect to fund innovative projects, and provide our clients with high-quality, third-party verified carbon offsets. Check out our offset projects below.

OUR CARBON OFFSETS ARE VERIFIED BY
Affordable Cookstoves
This project makes and distributes cookstoves that reduce charcoal or wood use for cooking by over 50%. It cuts carbon emissions and deforestation while providing life-changing health benefits and cost savings to local families.
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Uganda
We all cook, every day. Imagine if cooking ate up 20% of your income, deforested your country, and emitted toxic smoke into your family home. This simple, locally produced cookstove solves these world size problems and reduces tonnes of carbon emissions. It’s no wonder that awareness of the new stoves is sweeping across Uganda and demand for the stoves is at sell-out levels. Through this project we want to provide Ugandans with all the stoves they are clamoring for.
How it works
90% of Ugandans burn wood or charcoal in an open fire that emits more heat to the air than it does to their cookpots. The Uganda stove reduces the use of wood or charcoal by 50% because it burns the fuel thoroughly and efficiently and concentrates the heat from the fire directly to the cooking surface where it matters most. Less fuel burned used equals less greenhouse gas and toxic smoke emitted.

At scale, the dissemination of thousands of stoves from this project helps forests.  Less fuel means fewer trees are cut for wood and less charcoal is produced. Charcoal production does great harm to the environment requiring large logs and felled trees to be burned in mounds of earth for long periods of time.
Who it helps
By reducing greenhouse gas emissions and saving forests, this project benefits everyone, globally. The dissemination of thousands of stoves from this project helps forests. Less fuel means fewer trees are cut for wood and less charcoal is produced. Charcoal production does great harm to the environment requiring large logs and felled trees to be burned in mounds of earth for long periods of time. But the story goes much deeper. By supporting this project you give local families limited by traditional ways a cleaner, healthier life.
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Chyulu Hills
Protecting and preserving the black rhino’s stomping grounds.
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Kenya
Africa is home to 17% of the world’s forests but is losing them at four times the rate of the global average. A critical wildlife corridor, Chyulu Hills is located between two national parks, Amboseli and Tsavo, in southeastern Kenya and has been severely impacted by overgrazing, drought, deforestation, and forest degradation. This project aims to preserve the 410,000-hectare expanse while also preventing the emission of about 18 million tonnes of CO₂ over the 30-year life of the project.

The area plays a vital part in maintaining a large communal ecosystem by providing a variety of resources. It is home to Maasai pastoralists and subsistence farmers, as well as several vulnerable species of animals, and is a water source to the citizens of Mombasa just downstream. Most urgently, though, Chyulu is home to the critically endangered eastern black rhino.
How it works
The project, a multi-partner initiative, protects not only the Chyulu Hills cloud and lava forests, but also the surrounding savannah woodlands.

Local trust members such as four indigenous Maasai community groups, Kenya Wildlife Service, Kenya Forest Service, and three leading Kenyan conservation NGOs, work together to manage the project. Through long-term sustainable financing, this project aims to enhance and strengthen landscape protection, build local institutional capacity, create alternative employment opportunities, and support stricter environmental law enforcement. This combined effort will allow for sustainable use of the land and its natural resources.
Who it helps
The black rhino and other endangered species, through improved forest management. The people of Chyulu, by creating jobs and providing greater representation in institutions impacting the area. The earth, by decreasing emissions through the improved management of the forest and educating the local population on how to best care for the reserve.
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Native American Methane Capture
Capture methane and convert it to energy.
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Colorado
ethane is a greenhouse gas 25 times more damaging to Earth than CO₂. This project captures methane from coal seams at the surface of the mountains. Once the leak is contained, the natural gas is redirected to existing pipelines for use by homes, businesses and schools across the reservation. The Tribe has decided to invest in this system to protect their sacred tribal lands and the world’s environment. Bottom Line: This project is NOT fracking. It turns an obvious environmental problem into a productive solution. The Southern Ute Tribe willingly accepts the responsibility to protect the environment. With your support, the project will continue to grow and you’ll fulfill a responsibility to protect the earth of your own!
How it works
Methane is best known as the primary component of natural gas. It is a by-product of nature’s formation of coal, occurring over millions of years. When geological forces raise coal to the surface of the earth, methane escapes into the atmosphere. By channeling the methane into natural gas pipelines for public use, this project helps the environment by first eliminating the release of greenhouse gas, and then doubles the benefit by reusing the methane as a clean energy resource. Wow!
Who it helps
Mother Earth to begin with, our friends and animals who live on this land and the air that they breathe.  With the right equipment, this energy is free for the taking.  No bulldozers scraping at the earth, no uprooting of trees or grassland, just jobs, piping, and technology and you have clean energy for all kinds of use.  Isn’t that the way we’d all like to treat the planet?
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Alto Mayo Protected Forest
Tropical forests are the Earth’s lungs—absorbing CO₂ and releasing oxygen. This project seeks to protect nearly 450,000 acres from deforestation. More trees = more oxygen
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Peru
This project protects nearly 450,000 acres from deforestation. Since trees sequester carbon pollution, more trees = less CO₂. The Alto Mayo forest is twice the size of New York City but it’s under threat from deforestation despite its protected status. This project provides technical assistance and advice on the ground to transform illegal loggers into organic coffee farmers and eco-entrepreneurs. Local people earn more while taking pride in protecting the forest and its endangered plants and animals and the planet benefits. Bottom Line: Tropical forests are the Earth’s lungs—absorbing carbon pollution and releasing oxygen. By providing new and environmentally-friendly ways for Peruvians to use the forest, this project helps save the CO₂-absorbing rainforest from deforestation.
How it works
The Alto Mayo forest has a simple formula for planet-saving success: save trees in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. By teaming up with the local government and communities the project provides education and economic incentives to the local people in exchange for taking care of the land.
Who it helps
With more than 6 million tonnes of greenhouse gases reduced to date, this project is definitely helping to save the planet.  It also helps local families and ensures that for generations to come, people will enjoy this precious forest.
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Community Tree Planting
Helping small communities replant trees so they can counter the effects of poverty, deforestation, and harmful carbon emissions.
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Peru
The International Small Group and Tree Planting Program (TIST) is a combined reforestation and sustainable development project. The project works with small groups of poor farmers to replant trees which counters the devastating effects of deforestation, poverty and drought. Since TIST’s inception in 1999, they have helped plant over 18 million trees in Tanzania, India, Kenya, and Uganda.
How it works
TIST members are subsistence farmers and participate voluntarily. As a grassroots initiative, the farmers form small groups of 6 to 12 farmers. They are provided access to training that allows them to build on their own best practices which are then shared with the other 9,000 groups. These small groups benefit from a new income source: the sale of carbon credits that result from the sequestration of carbon from the atmosphere in the biomass of the trees and soil. This program incentivizes other individuals to join causing more carbon to be sequestered.
Who it helps
The sale of carbon credits provides income for participants and funding to address agricultural, HIV/AIDS, nutritional and fuel challenges for local communities.
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A Bearadise
These important old growth forests will reduce about 1.5 million tonnes of carbon in 30 years. This project ensures the survival of these trees, providing a safe home for the animals and clean air for Earth.
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Alaska
This project protects an old growth spruce forest on the North Coast of Afognak Island in Alaska. It will sequester about 1.5 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalents over its 30-year life. The project “protects unlogged forests that would be logged in the absence of carbon finance.” Unfortunately, harmful logging still happens on adjacent lands so protecting this portion is of utmost importance.
How it works
The island is in Southwestern Alaska about 40 miles a from Kodiak. It is remote and can only be accessed by boat or helicopter. The land parcel was created by the American Land Conservancy and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation between 2005-2009 with the objective of conserving the land in perpetuity. Prior to its acquisition, it was used exclusively for timber production. The project is now managed and monitored by the State of Alaska for the purpose of wilderness and ecosystem protection. Funds from the sale of carbon credits will be used to protect the property and the expense of annual monitoring, verification, registration and issuance.
Who it helps
Earth benefits by sequestering large amounts of carbon that are warming the planet. It also protects plants and animals that have been living there for thousands of years and maintains their home.
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OUR IMPACT

The Web Neutral Project has eliminated

7,612,000

pounds of CO2e

According to the EPA, that is equivalent to:

4,005,808 miles
Driven by a passenger vehicle.
184,356 Gallons
Of gasoline consumed.
1,791,115 pounds
Of coal burned.
3,793
Barrels of oil consumed.
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